Compétition > Jury

A panel of 7 jury is formed with renowned musicians. The jury has been invited by means of the artistic commitee.

Lyon International Chamber Music Competition is a member of the World Federation of International Music Competitions (WFIMC) from 2007.



Attila Falvay

Attila Falvay

violin
Hungary

  

Attila Falvay

Attila Falvay

violin
Hungary

Attila Falvay gained admission to the Liszt Academy at age 16, where he studied under Semyon Snitkovsky and graduated from the chamber music course taught by György Kurtág and András Mihály. He took second place at the Second Szigeti International Violin Competition in 1979 and first prize at the Hubay Competition the following year. In 1982, at the invitation of Dorothy Delay, he took part in a course and festival in Aspen, Colorado (USA). He also studied under Prof. József Sívó at Vienna’s University of Music and Performing Arts. He joined the Kodály Quartet in 1980. His work with the ensemble led to his being named an Artist of Merit in 1990 and receiving the Bartók–Pásztory Award in 1996. In addition to playing with the quartet, he also frequently performs as a soloist. He has performed with such famous conductors as Ken-Ichiro Kobayashi, Tamás Vásáry and Zoltán Kocsis. As a soloist, he has toured in Japan and various countries in Europe several times. From 1989 to 2005, he served as the principal concertmaster of the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. In 2005, he became the concertmaster of the Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra. Between 2006 and 2010 he taught violin and chamber music as a professor at the International Menuhin Music Academy (IMMA) in Blonay, Gstaad and Bern. He was appointed an adjunct professor in the Liszt Academy’s chamber music department in 2015. He is a member of the public body of the Hungarian Academy of Arts. On the occasion of Hungary’s national holiday on 15 March 2022, he was awarded the Kossuth Prize as a member of the Kodály String Quartet.

David Grimal

David Grimal

violin
France

  

David Grimal

David Grimal

violin
France

David Grimal is a musician who enjoys an international reputation for the originality of his musical career. In his tireless quest to reflect on the role of his art in society, he juxtaposes perspectives in order to make music differently by reinventing the sense of the collective.

As an internationally renowned soloist, he has been invited to perform under the direction of the leading conductors (Christoph Eschenbach, Heinrich Schiff, Lawrence Foster, Emmanuel Krivine, Mikhail Pletnev, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Peter Eötvös, Andris Nelsons, Jukka- Pekka Saraste, Christian Arming, Andrés Orozco-Estrada, Stanisław Skrowaczewski, Michel Plasson, Hubert Soudant, François-Xavier Roth, Pascal Rophé, Gerard Korsten, James Judd, Matthias Bamert, Lawrence Foster, Jaap van Sweden etc.) with such formations as the Orchestre de Paris, the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, the Berliner Symphoniker, the Russian National Orchestra, the New Japan Philharmonic, the English Chamber Orchestra, the Mozarteum Orchester Salzburg, the Jerusalem Symphony, the Prague Philharmonia, the Gulbenkian Orchestra Lisbon, Sinfonia Varsovia, the Florida Philharmonic and the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra…

He is a welcome guest in the world’s foremost concert halls, among them Suntory Hall in Tokyo, the Philharmonie de Paris, the Vienna Musikverein, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Berlin Konzerthaus, Wigmore Hall in London, the Zurich Tonhalle, Lincoln Center in New York, the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow, the Ferenc Liszt Academy in Budapest, the Victoria Hall in Geneva, the Auditorio Nacional in Madrid, the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, the National Concert Hall in Taiwan and Bozar in Brussels.

Many composers have dedicated works to him, including Marc-André Dalbavie, Brice Pauset, Thierry Escaich, Lisa Lim, Jean-François Zygel, Alexandre Gasparov, Victor Kissine, Fuminori Tanada, Ivan Fedele, Philippe Hersant, Anders Hillborg, Oscar Bianchi, Guillaume Connesson, Frédéric Verrières, Richard Dubugnon, Eric Montalbetti …

An indefatigable researcher, he re-examines the early music repertory and in particular explores historically informed performance practice with such musicians as Andreas Staier, Brice Pauset, Mathieu Dupouy and Maude Gratton. He is a sought-after pedagogue, and currently teaches at the Hochschule für Musik in Saarbrücken, where he also develops conductorless projects with the student orchestra. He plays the 1710 “Ex-Roederer” Stradivarius with bows by Pierre Tourte, Léonard and François-Xavier Tourte and Pierre Grunberger.

David Grimal is regularly invited to sit on the juries of international competitions and gives masterclasses all over the world.

Louise Hopkins

Louise Hopkins

cello
United-Kingdom

  

Louise Hopkins

Louise Hopkins

cello
United-Kingdom

Louise Hopkins studied at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama with Raphael Wallfisch and Steven Isserlis. From a very early age she attended the International Musicians' Seminars at Prussia Cove studying intensively with András Schiff for duo class and György Kurtág for Chamber Music alongside the cello masterclasses with Steven Isserlis and Ralph Kirshbaum.

Louise made her debut at the Barbican Hall playing Witold Lutosławski’s Cello Concerto (conducted by the composer) on which The Times commented that ‘players with such personality, agility and power are rare'. At this time she won a number of young artist awards resulting in numerous recitals throughout the UK. Louise also won the Frank Britton Award which resulted in her Wigmore debut aged 19, quickly followed for several years in succession with concerts at the Wigmore supported by the Tillet and Kirkman Trusts. She has continued to perform as a soloist and chamber musician and has developed an international career which has taken her all over Europe, USA, Australia,New Zealand and Japan.

A frequent participant at major festivals Louise has regularly visited Aldeburgh where she has performed chamber music and solo concerts including Britten’s Cello Symphony for a BBC Symphony Orchestra live broadcast conducted by Leonard Slatkin 37 years to the day of the first performance of the work at Snape Maltings. Other festivals include Cheltenham, Bath, Brighton, Harrogate, the Vertavo Quartet’s festival at Elverum in Norway, Dijon, the Belgrade Cello Festival, Amsterdam Cello Biennale 2010 and 2014, the Irish Chamber Orchestra's summer festival where she performed Tavener's The Protecting Veil and Trondheim International Chamber Music Festival 2013.

Louise has attended Open Chamber Music at Prussia Cove for over 20 years and participated in the 2008 tour culminating at the Wigmore Hall. She has broadcast frequently on the BBC, RTE, WFMT, Swiss Romande, ABC, New Zealand Radio and Radio France to name but a few. The London Sinfonietta released her BBC recording of Dai Fujikura’s Fifth Station for Cello and Orchestra (conducted by Martyn Brabbins) taken from a live performance at the Queen Elizabeth Hall as part of the 2006 Jerwood Foundation series which was reviewed by The Times as "brilliantly played".

As a chamber musician Louise has performed in venues from the Wigmore Hall to the Sydney Opera House. She has frequently appeared as a guest with the Takács Quartet and Thomas Adès with whom she has recorded his piano quartet Catch for EMI. She has been invited by Emmanuel Pahud to perform at the Wigmore and at his festival in Salon de Provence and also performed at Australia’s Chamber Music Festival from 2009-2011. She will return for their 25th anniversary in 2015. She performs regularly with the pianist Aleksandar Madžar with whom she has recorded sonatas by Schnittke, Carter and Rachmaninoff for a CD for Intim Musik. Other collaborations have included those with András Keller, Anthony Marwood, Alexander Janiczek, Ferenc Rados, Dénes Várjon, Kathryn Stott, Alexander Melnikov, Piers Lane, Tamara Stefanovich, François Leleux and Steven Kovacevich.

At the age of 25 Louise was one of the youngest ever professors to be appointed to the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, and was appointed Head of Strings in 2011. Before that she also taught at the Yehudi Menuhin School until 2006. She has given masterclasses in France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Serbia, The Netherlands, Singapore, and throughout the UK. In September 2007 Louise began as a Cello Professor at the Hochschule in Bern, Switzerland. She has been a jury member on a number of international competitions including the Banff and Trondheim String Quartet competitions.

Momo Kodama

Momo Kodama

piano
Japan

  

Momo Kodama

Momo Kodama

piano
Japan

Praised for her “impeccable technique and facility for crystalline sounds” (American Record Guide), “her natural ease and keen sense for drama” (BBC Music Magazine), “deliciously pearly touch” (Classical-Music) and “crisp, pointed and sensuous playing” (San Francisco Chronicle) Momo Kodama has built up an impressive career with performances with world-renowned orchestras such as the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Bayerisches Staatsorchester, NHK Symphony Orchestra, NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, Orchestre National de France, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo, Orchestre de Chambre de Paris and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, under the baton of Seiji Ozawa, Eliahu Inbal, Charles Dutoit, Kent Nagano, Roger Norrington, Lawrence Foster and André Previn. She has appeared at the Vienna Musikverein, Berlin Philharmonie, Berlin Konzerthaus, Suntory Hall Tokyo, Philharmonie de Paris, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris, Muziekgebouw aan ’t IJ in Amsterdam and the Wigmore Hall in London.

She is a regular guests at festivals including Marlboro, Verbier, La Roque d’Anthéron, Festival Chopin, Festival d’Automne, Festival Saint-Denis, Enesco Festival, Tivoli Festival, Settembre Musica, Schleswig-Holstein, Miyazaki and Matsumoto (Seiji Ozawa).

Momo Kodama enjoys making chamber music with partners including Christian Tetzlaff, Renaud Capuçon, Augustin Dumay, Gautier Capuçon, Steven Isserlis and Jörg Widmann. She also devised and performed a programme for the 100th anniversary of Debussy’s death, with actor Pascal Rénéric and bariton Josep-Ramon Olivé at La Bellevilloise in Paris with further repeats in France and China.

Her repertoire ranges from the classical and romantic periods to contemporary works. Composers such as Toshio Hosokawa, Jörg Widmann and Christian Mason have written especially for her. Momo Kodama is regarded as a highly distinguished interpreter of Olivier Messiaen’s oeuvre (among which the Turangalîla-Symphonie, the Vingt Regards sur l’enfant-Jésus, the Catalogue d’Oiseaux), and premiered his Fantaisie for Violin and Piano with Isabelle Faust in 2006.

Her latest recording for ECM, released in spring 2021, features concertos by Mozart and Toshio Hosokawa, with the Mito Chamber Orchestra conducted by Seiji Ozawa. Prior to this, her CD “La vallée des cloches” and “Point and Line – Hosokawa/Debussy Etudes” also released by ECM, received outstanding reviews from the New York Times, BBC Music Magazine (recording of the month), Classica (“Choc”), Neue Zürcher Zeitung, In addition, Momo Kodama has recorded two CD’s for Pentatone together with her pianist sister Mari with works by Tchaikovsky and Martinů, as well as four CD’s for Triton with works by Chopin, Debussy and Messiaen.

Born in Osaka in Japan, Momo Kodama spent her early years in Europe: educated at a German school, she attended the Conservatoire National Superieur de Musique de Paris. She continued her studies under Murray Perahia, András Schiff, Vera Gornostaeva and Tatiana Nikolayeva. In 1991, she became the youngest laureate of the ARD International Music Competition in Munich.

Momo Kodama is based in Paris. In her spare time she enjoys cooking, especially for and with friends and family.

Vincent Coq

Vincent Coq

piano
France

  

Vincent Coq

Vincent Coq

piano
France

Vincent Coq started studying the piano at age 7. Admitted to Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris at age 18, he won a piano First Prize in 1985, then pursued graduate studies under the guidance of Dominique Merlet.
After winning a First Prize in chamber music in 1984 in Geneviève Joy-Dutilleux’s class, he joined Jean-Claude Pennetier’s class to perfect his chamber music skills.
Vincent Coq then joined master classes taught by Nikita Malagoff, György Sandor and Leon Fleisher. In 1989, he worked under the direction of György Sebök at the Bloomington School of Music (USA).
As the same time as his career with the Trio Wanderer, Vincent Coq plays with many other musicians as Sophie Koch, Gérard Caussé, Antoine Tamestit, Susan Cairns, Wolfgang Holzmair, Karen Vourc’h, François Leleux, Anne Gastinel… He gives also concerts of melodrama’s repertoire with the actor Eric Genovese,Sociétaire de la Comédie Française.
Vincent Coq is Professor of chamber music at the Lausanne’s Haute Ecole de Musique. Vincent Coq has opened with his Trio Wanderer’s colleagues, a piano trio class at the Paris’ CRR which prepares ensembles for concerts and international competition.
Virtuose pianist Vincent Coq performs impeccably weaving a rich tapestry of whose notes whose velvet schimmer sets off the playing of the strings. One seems to be hearing Menahem Pressler when the Beaux-Arts Trio was in its prime.” (Le Devoir – Montreal)

 

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